Are leaks my landlord’s responsibility?

Leaks in your property can cause severe structural damage and even have the potential to damage electrical wiring, putting the health and safety of you and your family at risk. As well as this your belongings could also be damaged as a resul. If you have a leak contact us to file a no win no fee housing disrepair claim

Under Section 11 of the Landlord and Tenant Act, 1985 landlord’s are responsible for maintaining and carrying out repair work to the exterior and structure of their rented property, this includes water installations, heating systems, drains and external pipes, sanitary fittings, gas and electricity.

This means that water leaks in your rental property will usually be your landlord’s responsibility to repair. Your landlord must ensure that your home is safe and fit for human habitation, if there is a water leak in your property then they will usually need to make repairs and could also be responsible for repairing water damage that has resulted from the leak.

Section 11 will apply to your tenancy unless your tenancy has a fixed term of 7 years or more or if it started before October 24th 1961.

Although in most cases landlord’s are responsible for repairing water leaks this does depend on why the leak has occurred.

Leaks caused by tenants

If a water leak has been caused by you because you have made alterations to the pipework without your landlord’s permission then your landlord may not be responsible for making the repairs. Your tenancy agreement should outline what alterations you are allowed to make and you should only carry out repairs if the tenancy agreement says you can or if you get permission from your landlord beforehand.

Landlord’s do not have to repair damage which is the tenant’s responsibility. You could be liable for damage caused by attempts to make repairs without following the rules of your tenancy agreement.

In some cases, you can also be liable if you live in an apartment block and cause leaks to other properties, for example, if you overfill the bath and cause leaks in a neighbour’s flat.

Ashley Y

Council Tenant

We had been waiting for 12 months for the damp to be repaired by the council but got nowhere. We were told by a friend that this company could help and within 6 months we received compensation for damages & all the damp and mould was removed.

Liam M

Council Tenant

My flat was repaired in time for my child’s birth and I received rent refunds and compensation. The team were very helpful and understanding of my dangerous situation.

client 4

Wayne B

Housing Association Tenant

client 4 client 4 client 4 client 4 client 4

Couldn’t leave any clothes in any of the bedrooms due to dampness and mould, our clothes, possessions & electronics were ruined and not to mention the huge amounts of stress this caused over the years. I am so grateful for your help with getting my property repaired for me & the financial compensation awarded to me has changed my life. Thank you so much

Are you a Council or Housing association Tenant with housing disrepair issues? If so we can help you claim compensation on a NO Win, NO Fee basis.

Leaks caused by tenants

If a water leak has been caused by you because you have made alterations to the pipework without your landlord’s permission then your landlord may not be responsible for making the repairs. Your tenancy agreement should outline what alterations you are allowed to make and you should only carry out repairs if the tenancy agreement says you can or if you get permission from your landlord beforehand.

Landlord’s do not have to repair damage which is the tenant’s responsibility. You could be liable for damage caused by attempts to make repairs without following the rules of your tenancy agreement.

In some cases, you can also be liable if you live in an apartment block and cause leaks to other properties, for example, if you overfill the bath and cause leaks in a neighbour’s flat.

Leaks in communal areas

Your landlord is also usually responsible for repairs to common areas in your rental property such as staircases and hallways, if you’re unsure whether this applies to you then you should check your tenancy agreement.

If a leak happens because your landlord has failed to make repairs in a communal area that they are responsible for then they will need to repair any damage caused to your home.

With most repairs, your landlord is only responsible if you have notified them about the issue. However, repairs to communal areas are different and you are not responsible for notifying your landlord about them. Instead, your landlord becomes responsible for repairs in common areas immediately.

How to spot a leak in my rental home?

It is usually easy to spot a leak in your rental property, you can check for a leak by either checking the water meter or by looking for damp patches, mould on the ceiling or walls, water stains on the floors or by checking that the water pressure is normal. It is important to recognise whether the leak is major or minor so that you know what course of action to take.

Minor leaks can usually be repaired quickly and do not cause substantial damage. A leak could be classed as minor if for example if there is only a small amount of water that can be easily contained, if the leak is not constant or if there has only been minimal damage.

A leak could be classed as a major leak if there is a constant flow of water, the water cannot be contained, the water is dirty (this could be a sign of leaks in a sewage pipe) or if the leak is affecting electrical fittings.

Major water leaks can cause substantial damage and could be a serious risk to your health and safety. If responsible, your landlord should repair major leaks quickly. They should also repair minor leaks within a reasonable timeframe as they can still cause damage.

What to do if you find a water leak in your property?

If there is a leak in your home then you should start by trying to find the source of the leak so that you can assess whether the leak is major or not and what other issues it could cause.

You may need to turn off the water supply to prevent further damage until repairs can be made. For your own safety, you should also switch off any plugs and appliances near the leak.

Next, you should inform your landlord about the leak. If it is a major leak that needs to be dealt with urgently then you should call the emergency number your landlord has given you.

Your landlord should then repair the issue in a timely manner. You will need to allow access to the property for repairs to be made.

Are you a Council or Housing association Tenant with housing disrepair issues? If so we can help you claim compensation on a NO Win, NO Fee basis.

What should I do if my landlord won’t repair a leak in my rental property?

If your landlord refuses to repair the leak then you should make an official complaint to them, your landlord may have their own complaints procedure that you can follow.

If you are not satisfied with your landlord’s response to your complaint, or if they have still not repaired the leak then you could also complain to your local council about them. The council may be able to order your landlord to make the repair. If your local authority is your landlord then they could be responsible for repairing the leak. You should contact your local council to report the repair and if they fail to carry it out then you can make a complaint to the Housing Ombudsman.

If you have followed the above steps and your landlord has still failed to repair the water leak or damages caused by the leak then you could be eligible to make a housing disrepair claim against them. If you choose to take court action against your landlord then the court could order your landlord to make the repairs and you could also be entitled to compensation.

What if a leak has increased my water bill?

If your rented council home or housing association property has issues that have not been repaired find out if you are eligible to make a housing disrepair claim for property repair and compensation.

We are National Housing Disrepair experts.

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